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Craig Eagle

Craig Eagle

MD

Vice President, Head of BioOncology, US Medical Affairs
Genentech

Tracks covered by Craig

About this Speaker

Dr. Craig Eagle, MD, is Head of BioOncology for US Medical Affairs at Genentech. Dr. Eagle has a wealth of oncology experience. He joined Pfizer Australia in 2001 as part of the medical group. In Australia, his role involved leading and participating in scientific research, regulatory and pricing & reimbursement negotiations for compounds in therapeutic areas including oncology, anti-infectives, respiratory, arthritis and pain management. In 2003, Dr. Eagle led the worldwide development of Celecoxib in oncology to oversee the global research program. He was responsible for the global research plans and teams for Irinotecan and Dalteparin. He served as Head of the Oncology Therapeutic Area Global Medical Group for Pfizer, including the US oncology business. Dr. Eagle also led the integration of the Pfizer/Wyeth oncology businesses and portfolio. Over his 17 years with Pfizer, he held several roles, including Head of the Global Medical Affairs Oncology and Outcomes Research organization, managing an international group of medical directors and researchers involved in all phases of clinical studies and outcomes research. He then transitioned into a role as VP of Global Oncology Strategic Alliances & Partnerships, serving on the Global Oncology Business’s executive leadership team. He attended Medical School at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia and received his general internist training at Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney. He completed his hemato-oncology and laboratory hematology training at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney, and was granted Fellowship in the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (FRACP) and the Royal College of Pathologists Australasia (FRCPA). After his training, Dr. Eagle performed basic research at the Royal Prince of Wales hospital to develop a new monoclonal antibody to inhibit platelets.